Abrahms-Kavunenko, Saskia

Hailing from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at The University of Western Australia, Dr Saskia Abrahms–Kavunenko has ongoing research interests in religion, globalization, psychological anthropology, urban anthropology, Buddhism, New Religious Movements, postsocialist societies, nationalism, cosmopolitanism and the anthropology of morality. Her recently completed doctoral dissertation examines how Buddhism is being rediscovered in, and reintroduced to, Mongolia after the end of the socialist period. It discusses the politicisation of Buddhism in the formation of postsocialist nationalist identities, the influence of globalisation on the renewal of Buddhist institutions, and the global and local

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Altanbulag 

Professor at Ethnology Department of School of Ethnology and Sociology, Inner Mongolia University. He teaches on research methods of anthropology, ecological and environmental anthropology and social theories and his research interests focus on Northern ethnic minorities, drought area and pastoral areas. 

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Akira, Kamimura

Research fellow and lecturer at Tokyo University of Foreign Studies.

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Bareja-Starzyńska, Agata

Head of the Department of Turkish Studies and Inner Asian Peoples at the Faculty of Oriental Studies of the University of Warsaw, lecturer at the Seminar of South Asia at the Faculty of Modern Philologies of the University of Adam Mickiewicz in Poznań.

Mongolist and Tibetologist, scholarly interests focus on Buddhism in Mongolia and Tibet, Mongolian-Tibetan relations, Mongolian and Tibetan Buddhist literature. Author of the translation from Mongolian into Polish of Czikula kereglegczi. Zasady buddyzmu [Chikula kereglegchi. Principles of Buddhism], WUW, 2006 and co-author with Marek Mejor of Klasyczny Jezyk tybetański [Classical Tibetan language], Warszawa, Dialog, 2002. Co-editor of In the Heart of Mongolia. 100th Anniversary of W. Kotwicz’s Expedition to Mongolia in 1912 (Selected Source Materials and Study), Cracow 2012.

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Birtalan, Ágnes

Associate professor, head of the Department of Inner Asian Studies and deputy director of the Institute of Far Eastern Studies, University ELTE. She teaches on various fields of Mongolian studies (dialects, religions, traditional nomadic culture, folklore), Korean religions. Her research interest focus on philology and ethnology of various Mongolian ethnic groups, with special focus on the textual tradition of the Oirads and Darkhads, including oral and written ritual texts of shamanic and folk religious activities. 

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Bulag, Uradyn

Reader at Division of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge. His research interests focus on East Asia (China, Japan, Taiwan) and Inner Asia (Mongolia, Tibet); comparative colonialism and imperialism (pan-Asianism; diplomacy; alter/native urbanisation); ethnicity and nationalism (hybridity; national unity; collaborative nationalism); (un)sharing cultures and histories (Mongolia-Tibet interface; politics of friendship; national heritage regimes; translingual practices); socialist/post-socialist political forms and imagination (minority revolution; autonomous institutions and laws; frontier films).

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Buyandelger, Manduhai

She received her B.A. and M.A. in Literature and Linguistics from Mongolian National University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from Harvard University (2004). Prior to joining Anthropology at MIT she was a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows and taught at the Harvard Anthropology Department. Her book Tragic Spirits: Shamanism, Socialism, and the State of Neoliberalism in Mongolia (University of Chicago Press) tells a story of the collapse of the socialist state and the responses of marginalized rural nomads to the devastating changes through the revival of their previously suppressed shamanic practices. In her next project "Technologies of Election: Gender, Media, and Neoliberal State Formation in Mongolia ," the transformation of the former socialist state into a neoliberal one by looking at women's participation in parliamentary elections. She is a member of the project "Oral History of Twentieth Century Mongolia" (2007-2012) at the Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit of the University of Cambridge University in the UK.

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Empson, Rebecca 

Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University College London. She teaches on kinship and economics and is currently working on the emerging subjects of the new Mongolian economy, generated through large-scale mining investments. Her book, Harnessing Fortune (OUP), was published in 2011. It will soon be available as a downloadable e-book on the British Academy website.

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Finke, Peter

Professor and Chair of the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, and co-director of the Centre for Anthropological Studies on Central Asia (CASCA). He holds a PhD from the University of Cologne and a Habilitation (post-doctoral degree) from the University of Leipzig.

Since the beginning of the 1990s, he has conducted extensive field research in different parts of Central and Inner Asia, including Mongolia, Kazakstan and Uzbekistan. His early work focused on the procedures and consequences of the de-collectivization among pastoralists in Western Mongolia and the economic and strategies that people employed to re-organize their lives after the dismissal of the socialist system. In addition, he has conducted research on the migration of the Kazak diasporas to Kazakstan after the latter's independence and on the formations and variations on Uzbek identity.

Currently, he is planning a restudy of the livelihoods of pastoralists in Western Mongolia and how their fate has changed in recent years in connection with climatic hazards and increasing market integration. He also continues to work on the Kazak diasporas, both those that migrated to Kazakstan as well as those who remained at place and more generally on issues of rural development, social change as well as on the cognitive basis of cultural meanings and ideologies.

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Gaëlle, Lacaze

Assistant Professor, Department of Ethnology, Strasbourg University.

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High, Mette

British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellow.

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Humphrey, Caroline

Professor Humphrey has held appointments in the Department of Social Anthropology, Cambridge since 1978. Together with Urgunge Onon she founded the Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit (MIASU) in 1986. She retired from her post as Sigrid Rausing Professor of Collaborative Anthropology, University of Cambridge in October 2010 and became Director of MIASU.

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Kazato, Mari

Lecturer, Hokusei Gakuen University

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Küçüküstel, Selcen 

His research interests are ecological anthropology, hunter-gatherers, visual anthropology, Central Asia, disappearing languages, Shamanism

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Kohl-Garrity, Elisa

She is currently working at the department ‘Resilience and Transformation in Eurasia’ at the Max-Planck Institute in Halle and am part of the ANARCHIE (Anthropology, Archeology and History) research school. Having worked on the value of respect in Mongolia during her master’s studies she decided it was time to explore this topic with a more historical focus to guarantee a more in-depth approach to such an important topic. She had conducted field research and gotten familiar with the topic of respect during my stay in one of the geriin khoroolol (ger districts) of Ulaanbaatar, working and living with school drop outs.  

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Konagaya, Yuki

Professor, National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka, Japan. Her concern is wide from the techniques to the ritual of Mongolian custom related animals and wrote many articles. Recently she have concentrated in the modern history especially in the socialist modernization that covered all over the world in the 20th century. With some colleagues she collected many life stories of ordinary women in Inner Mongolia or elite men in Mongolia, and so on. Some of them are published and you can read from the web site. Besides continuing the publishing these materials I would like to focus on the resource nationalism as part of environmental studies.

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Liron, Tal

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Maria Fernandez-Gimenez

My research interests include both ecological and social dimensions of wildland ecosystems, focusing primarily on rangelands. Current and past projects have addressed the following themes: community-based and collaborative natural resource management; traditional and local ecological knowledge; pastoralism and pastoral development; participatory research; effects of livestock grazing and other disturbances on the structure and function of rangeland ecosystems.

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Mátyás,Balogh

Assistant professor, Department of Inner-Asian Studies at the Eötvös Loránd University since 2005. As a university student of the Inner-Asian Department at ELTE, he was interested in Mongolian dialects, especially Halh vernacular, and the variety of Buryat spoken in Mongolia. During his fieldwork in 2003, in Dornod province he met the renowned Buryat shaman, Ceren Baawai, and became interested in the contemporary forms of Mongolian shamanism.  The next year in 2004-05 he went back to Mongolia with the purpose to conduct a thorough research on contemporary Mongolian Shamanism. This research was not restricted to Buryat shamans, it involved a number of Darhad shamans, but the dominant part of the material he collected came from Buryat sources. Therefore he wrote my Ph.D thesis on Contemporary Buryat Shamanism. (Contemporary Buriad Shamanism in Mongolia, defended in 2012). Recently he have become interested in the Sino-Mongolian frontier region, Mongols living in China, especially the smaller isolated groups such as the Tibetanized Oirad Mongols in Qinghai Province, the Halh immigrants in Gansu, or the Gorlos in Jilin.

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MeiHua

Associate Professor, School of Ethnology and Sociology, Inner Mongolian University. Her main research area is about the present state of Mongolian’s religions belief and she also have great interest in this area. Religion is mysterious and relate to almost every social activity. Today, not only Shamanism and Buddhism are spreading among the Mongolians. Christianity, Catholicism and Islam are also growing. A series of conflicting and interrelated pairs of concepts such as development and backwardness, tradition and modern, gain and loss demands our reconsideration and redefinition. Religion is one of the best perspectives to take a panoramic view of human history. Because it infiltrates our quotidian lives and ultimate aims.

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Michelet, Aude


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Namsaraeva, Sayana

She is involved in the Research project ‘Where Rising Powers Meet: China and Russia at Their North Asian Border’ headed by prof. C.Humphrey and  supported by ESRC (2012-1015). Her research focuses on historical anthropology, Qing China colonial Policy in Inner Asia, Russia – China frontiers and borderlands, transborder Buriad ethnic relations,  Eastern Siberia, Mongolia and Manchuria.

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Narangoa, Li 

Professor, School of Culture, History & Language, Australian National University. She specialises in modern Japanese and Mongolian history, culture and politics. Before she joined the ANU staff member she was researcher at the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (Copenhagen). She teaches courses in Japanese history and language, Mongolian history as well as broader thematic courses including 'Lies, Conspiracy and Propaganda'. Her current research interests include Japan's relations with other Asian countries, Japan's colonial history, religion and military, Mongolian history, identity and cities. Her interests also cover borders and empires in general as well as international relations in Northeast Asia.

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Nasanbayar

Professor/Dean, Department of Ethnology, School of Ethnology and Sociology, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, China. His research focuses on social anthropology and modern Mongol culture: ethnic identity, historical memory, social changes, language issues.

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Pedersen, Morten

Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Copenhagen, where he has worked since completing my PhD at the University of Cambridge in 2002 and his M.Phil. at Aarhus University in 1997. He has conducted more than four years of ethnographic fieldwork among nomads in Far Eastern Russia, nomads, hunters and villagers in Northern Mongolia, market vendors in Ulaanbaatar, traders in Western China, and workers, officials and pastoralists in South-Eastern Mongolia. His research interests include: shamanism, political cosmology, postsocialist transition, social networks, hope and creativity; and collaboration and experimentation. His work has thus covered a wide spectrum of questions, ranging from spirit cosmologies, nomadism, and political imaginaries in Northern Mongolia over forms of livelihood and economic strategies in urban Mongolia and other postsocialist contexts to, most recently, the ramifications of China’s growing global clout. Still, the bulk of his research has fallen within the anthropology of religion (shamanism, animism, Buddhism and most recently Christianity), the anthropology of politics (imbrications between politics and religion, security/uncertainty), and anthropological theory (notably in conjunction with the “ontological turn").

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Sneath, David 

Reader at Division of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge. His research interests focus in Inner and Central Asia; pastoralism; land use and the environment; decollectivisation and post-socialist social transformations; political culture and economic institutions in Inner Asia; and the anthropology of development.

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